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How is nonprofit work like a mission to Pluto? (Report from #NN15)

Do you ever feel like you are on a never-ending mission towards a target you can't see, hurtling 30,000 miles-per-hour into a great dark void that's full of unknown obstacles, with a computer as your only lifeline to humanity? Is that just me? In our work, it often feels like…

What brain science tells us about website design

According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the average attention span is now just 8 seconds. That doesn’t give us a lot of time to engage website visitors before they lose interest and click elsewhere. Fortunately, the science that is tracking our shrinking attention spans also offers some insights…

Using video for social change (Part 2)

You’re making a video! That’s awesome. Now what? In my first post I shared several core concepts we use when building video for social change: creating effective viewer engagement, finding a story about an individual to represent your cause, and sharing successes rather than dwelling on problems. As you move…

Using video for social change (Part 1)

Videos have taken center stage in communications: explainer videos describe how a new app works; instructional videos show how to change your furnace’s air filter; advertising videos are designed to go viral (like that Dollar Shave Club spot). If you’re trying to drive social or environmental change, you are asking…

Planning a panel that pops

Picture this: You are at a conference and sitting in a panel session and get that sinking feeling that you chose the wrong session. Your first signal is the lengthy introductions given by the moderator for each panelist, each taken verbatim from the bios in your conference packet. Then each…

A garden that works – for homeowners and clean water

The traditional water pollution prevention story goes something like this: industrial operator, either nefariously or ignorantly, dumps nasty stuff into the water. Someone cries foul – often an intrepid group of scrappy environmentalists – and regulators step in. The polluter gets a big fine, agrees to change their ways and…