You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer that is not supported by this website. If possible, please upgrade, or install a different browser.

Water

Conservation with heart: Lessons from UNESCO

“Conservation is not a biological challenge. It’s social, political and economic.” On the final day of this year’s World Heritage Marine Managers Conference, Rare’s Brett Jenks summed up the challenge and the opportunity before us. We have a whole lot of science and best management practices that tell us how…

Connecting the dots on #waterjustice

Water has been central to our work for decades. Whether we’re fighting to close a dirty and outdated coal plant in Nevada, advocating for forest protection in New Jersey, or promoting women’s health in the Global South, we know that no community or landscape can thrive without clean, safe and…

Tó Éí Ííńá (Water is Life): The impact of the Gold Mine Spill on the Navajo Nation

In early August approximately 3 million gallons of toxic waste spilled from the Gold King Mine into the Animas River in Colorado, making national headlines. News reports describe the plume of toxic waste as containing lead, arsenic, copper, calcium cadmium, aluminum and other heavy metals. Photos shared over social media…

Mainstreaming water conservation: lessons from energy efficiency

As the megadrought continues, public agencies and nonprofit organizations are upping the ante on water conservation campaigns.  San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is working to sex up water savings with ads that call for “quickies” (short showers) and “full frontal” high efficiency washers. Denver Water has long used eye-catching art…

A comeback story deserves a great website

As we’ve said elsewhere on this blog, visuals and personal stories are powerful tools to help connect people emotionally to important issues. The new Great Lakes Impact website—launched yesterday by the Joyce Foundation—combines strong visuals and human-centric stories to draw viewers into the progress that’s been made in recent years…

Water over the dam

Here’s a riddle: what has been around since WWII and is covered with wooden and metal spikes? If you said the Buckley Dam on Washington’s White River, congratulations! For those that got it wrong, here’s the deal: This dilapidated old dam once diverted water to a now closed hydropower facility,…

Be prepared – it’s not just a Scout motto

Unless you’ve been living under a proverbial rock, you heard about Toledo’s drinking water crisis, when an algae outbreak right over the city's municipal water intake in Lake Erie led to dangerous levels of toxic microcystins. For two days in early August, Toledo residents were forced to scrounge and pay…

The first rule of talking about nitrogen…

Who cares about nitrogen pollution? Chances are, you do. You just don’t know it yet. Nitrogen as an element is absolutely necessary to life, but as with so many essentials, you can have too much of a good thing. Excess nitrogen – from tailpipes, smokestacks and most seriously from manures…

Toxic algae crisis isn’t over for Lake Erie or the nation

Toledo drinking water ban should be a warning to other cities After a weekend of scrambling to find bottled water for drinking, cooking and other household uses, residents of northwestern Ohio and southwestern Michigan were told Monday that their tapwater is again safe to drink. But for how long? Toxic…

Communicating the value of ocean protection

President Obama made headlines around the world recently when he announced plans to create the world’s largest marine preserve in the Pacific Ocean. When you are talking about two million square kilometers of pristine coral reefs, it’s easy to grasp the significance of a marine protected area.  The smaller protected…